Individuals in the entertainment industry have started coming forward to reveal harassment they have faced throughout their careers. In response to these revelations, filmmakers and showrunners have started depicting such harassment on screen. For example, the web television series The Morning Show explores the backlash that a network faces after a popular anchor on its news and morning talk show program is involved in a sexual misconduct scandal. While fictional, The Morning Show mirrors real-life occurrences. To tell such stories as accurately as possible, filmmakers and showrunners continue to seek firsthand accounts from the individuals involved in these real-life scandals. The problem: many of these individuals signed non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) as part of a settlement.

Non-Disclosure Agreements

NDAs are descriptively named—an NDA is an agreement not to disclose certain information. In the settlement context, one party usually pays the other to stay silent, and many NDAs include a “liquidated damages” provision, which sets monetary consequences of improper disclosure of the applicable information. Despite having signed NDAs, many of the individuals who choose to share their stories do so knowing their disclosures could subject them to significant financial costs.


Continue Reading The Cost of Breaching a Non-Disclosure Agreement

The NCAA has traditionally restricted college athletes from accepting any endorsements or compensation related to their participation in college sports. But less than a month after California enacted the Fair Pay to Play Act, which will prohibit the NCAA from preventing college athletes in the state from profiting off their commercial identities starting in 2023, the NCAA’s board voted unanimously to allow students across the country to benefit from the use of their “names, images, or likenesses.”

Name, Image, and Likeness

The right to profit from the commercial use of one’s name, image, and likeness, referred to as the right of publicity, prevents others from exploiting one’s identity without consent. Arguably, the NCAA’s previous policies interfered with athletes’ rights of publicity—while the NCAA and its member schools profited from college athletes’ names, images, and likenesses, the athletes received no compensation.


Continue Reading Questions Remain After NCAA Vote Allows Student Athletes to Cash In